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2017
2011
Cockburn`s: Vintage Port
LIMITED In Stock (1 Available)
WINE
ADVOCATE
94-96

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2015
Crasto: Crasto Red, Douro
In Stock (12 Available)
SOTHEBY'S
91
WINE
SPECTATOR
91
WINE
ADVOCATE
91

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2011
Croft: Vintage Port
In Stock (10 Available)
SOTHEBY'S
94+

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1994
Dow`s: Vintage Port
LIMITED In Stock (1 Available)
WINE
SPECTATOR
97
WINE
ADVOCATE
96

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2012
Foz de Arouce: Beiras Tinto
In Stock (10 Available)
SOTHEBY'S
89
WINE
SPECTATOR
87
WINE
ADVOCATE
88

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2011
Graham`s: Vintage Port
In Stock (5 Available)
SOTHEBY'S
96
WINE
SPECTATOR
94-97

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2016
Graham`s: Vintage Port
In Stock (24+) SEE MORE SIZES
SOTHEBY'S
95
WINE
SPECTATOR
98
WINE
ADVOCATE
95

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1940
Massandra: Ai Danil, Pinot Gris
In Stock (23 Available)

Fine tawny/mahogany. Deep nose reminiscent of plain chocolate. A rich palate with good finish. Still developing.

THE MASSANDRA COLLECTION

 

It is difficult to establish exactly when the Massandra Collection was started but Prince Golitzin donated a large number of wines he had obtained from Europe as well as ones he had made himself. The Collection remained quite safe until the Revolution in October 1917. Although the Bolsheviks established Soviet power by the middle of January 1918 Massandra and the Crimea remained in the control of the White Russians. The violent struggle continued for a further three years exacerbated by German invaders, Anglo-French interventionists and the Russian Counter revolution. Throughout this period, the Collection remained hidden because of the entrance to the tunnels in which it was stored had been bricked up and concealed.

 

In November 1920 the Red Army finally took control of the Crimea and the Collection was discovered intact shortly afterwards. In 1922 on Stalin’s orders all the wines to be found in any of the Tsar’s palaces including those at Moscow, St. Petersburg and Livadia were brought to Massandra. Some of these were sold off at this time but the majority were added to the Collection.

 

Upon Nazi invasion in 1941, the Collection was evacuated to three separate locations including Golitzin’s original cellars at Novy Svet, and was to remain there until after the liberation of Yalta by the Detached Seaboard Army in April 1944. Late in 1944, the entire Collection was returned to its original resting place.


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1945
Massandra: Liqueur White Muscat
In Stock (20 Available)

Muscats

With extended ageing these Muscats become intensely perfumed and refined.

Pale ochre/tawny. Fine muscat nose. Superb muscat flavor, intense, exceptionally long aftertaste. Very rich.

THE MASSANDRA COLLECTION

It is difficult to establish exactly when the Massandra Collection was started but Prince Golitzin donated a large number of wines he had obtained from Europe as well as ones he had made himself. The Collection remained quite safe until the Revolution in October 1917. Although the Bolsheviks established Soviet power by the middle of January 1918 Massandra and the Crimea remained in the control of the White Russians. The violent struggle continued for a further three years exacerbated by German invaders, Anglo-French interventionists and the Russian Counter revolution. Throughout this period, the Collection remained hidden because of the entrance to the tunnels in which it was stored had been bricked up and concealed.

In November 1920 the Red Army finally took control of the Crimea and the Collection was discovered intact shortly afterwards. In 1922 on Stalin’s orders all the wines to be found in any of the Tsar’s palaces including those at Moscow, St. Petersburg and Livadia were brought to Massandra. Some of these were sold off at this time but the majority were added to the Collection.

Upon Nazi invasion in 1941, the Collection was evacuated to three separate locations including Golitzin’s original cellars at Novy Svet, and was to remain there until after the liberation of Yalta by the Detached Seaboard Army in April 1944. Late in 1944, the entire Collection was returned to its original resting place.


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1936
Massandra: Livadia Red Port
In Stock (9 Available)

LIVADIA RED PORT

 

This is a wine grown at Livadia and made exclusively from the Cabernet Sauvignon grape when they have reached a natural sugar content of 22%. Like the Massandra Red Port it was aged for three years in large oak barrels. The 1891 vintage is the first Red Port ever produced in the Crimea and one of the finest ever made. Red Port was reserved for the sole use of the Tsar and members of the Royal family and the Court. Significantly it is still one of the most desirable wines in the former U.S.S.R.

 

Developed amber tawny, with a touch of orange/apricot and water white edge. Good nose with some ripe fruit. Quite a lot richer on the palate, easily the sweetest of the Livadia Red Ports. Long aftertaste. Rich, ripe, lingering.

THE MASSANDRA COLLECTION

It is difficult to establish exactly when the Massandra Collection was started but Prince Golitzin donated a large number of wines he had obtained from Europe as well as ones he had made himself. The Collection remained quite safe until the Revolution in October 1917. Although the Bolsheviks established Soviet power by the middle of January 1918 Massandra and the Crimea remained in the control of the White Russians. The violent struggle continued for a further three years exacerbated by German invaders, Anglo-French interventionists and the Russian Counter revolution. Throughout this period, the Collection remained hidden because of the entrance to the tunnels in which it was stored had been bricked up and concealed.

 

In November 1920 the Red Army finally took control of the Crimea and the Collection was discovered intact shortly afterwards. In 1922 on Stalin’s orders all the wines to be found in any of the Tsar’s palaces including those at Moscow, St. Petersburg and Livadia were brought to Massandra. Some of these were sold off at this time but the majority were added to the Collection.

 

Upon Nazi invasion in 1941, the Collection was evacuated to three separate locations including Golitzin’s original cellars at Novy Svet, and was to remain there until after the liberation of Yalta by the Detached Seaboard Army in April 1944. Late in 1944, the entire Collection was returned to its original resting place.


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1940
Massandra: Livadia Red Port
In Stock (20 Available)

LIVADIA RED PORT

 

This is a wine grown at Livadia and made exclusively from the Cabernet Sauvignon grape when they have reached a natural sugar content of 22%. Like the Massandra Red Port it was aged for three years in large oak barrels. The 1891 vintage is the first Red Port ever produced in the Crimea and one of the finest ever made. Red Port was reserved for the sole use of the Tsar and members of the Royal family and the Court. Significantly it is still one of the most desirable wines in the former U.S.S.R.

 

Medium tawny. One of the best Livadia Red Ports on the nose with ripe fruit and a hint of crème caramel. Good.

THE MASSANDRA COLLECTION

It is difficult to establish exactly when the Massandra Collection was started but Prince Golitzin donated a large number of wines he had obtained from Europe as well as ones he had made himself. The Collection remained quite safe until the Revolution in October 1917. Although the Bolsheviks established Soviet power by the middle of January 1918 Massandra and the Crimea remained in the control of the White Russians. The violent struggle continued for a further three years exacerbated by German invaders, Anglo-French interventionists and the Russian Counter revolution. Throughout this period, the Collection remained hidden because of the entrance to the tunnels in which it was stored had been bricked up and concealed.

 

In November 1920 the Red Army finally took control of the Crimea and the Collection was discovered intact shortly afterwards. In 1922 on Stalin’s orders all the wines to be found in any of the Tsar’s palaces including those at Moscow, St. Petersburg and Livadia were brought to Massandra. Some of these were sold off at this time but the majority were added to the Collection.

 

Upon Nazi invasion in 1941, the Collection was evacuated to three separate locations including Golitzin’s original cellars at Novy Svet, and was to remain there until after the liberation of Yalta by the Detached Seaboard Army in April 1944. Late in 1944, the entire Collection was returned to its original resting place.


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1939
Massandra: Massandra Red Port
In Stock (9 Available)

Massandra Ports

 

The production of ‘Port’ wine began in the Crimea in 1871 under the direction of Prince Golitzin and was further developed on a commercial scale by I.A. Bianki, A.P. Serboulenko and A.V. Keller. Massandra Red Port is the produce of several grape varieties grown in more than one viticultural region. The main grape used was Mourvedre (60-70%) which was blended with a selection of local grapes of which Saperavi was the most important. Harvested when the sugar content was about 20% the must was fortified to produce a wine with an alcohol level of between 17-19% and a residual sugar of between 60 and 100 grams per litre. The wine was aged for three years in large oak casks before bottling. The oldest known vintage is the 1893.

 

Developed amber yellow tawny with water white edge. Full aromatic nose, sweet. The palate has good depth with a degree of fatness, sugar and good length. Noticeable acidity on the finish gives freshness.

THE MASSANDRA COLLECTION

It is difficult to establish exactly when the Massandra Collection was started but Prince Golitzin donated a large number of wines he had obtained from Europe as well as ones he had made himself. The Collection remained quite safe until the Revolution in October 1917. Although the Bolsheviks established Soviet power by the middle of January 1918 Massandra and the Crimea remained in the control of the White Russians. The violent struggle continued for a further three years exacerbated by German invaders, Anglo-French interventionists and the Russian Counter revolution. Throughout this period, the Collection remained hidden because of the entrance to the tunnels in which it was stored had been bricked up and concealed.

 

In November 1920 the Red Army finally took control of the Crimea and the Collection was discovered intact shortly afterwards. In 1922 on Stalin’s orders all the wines to be found in any of the Tsar’s palaces including those at Moscow, St. Petersburg and Livadia were brought to Massandra. Some of these were sold off at this time but the majority were added to the Collection.

 

Upon Nazi invasion in 1941, the Collection was evacuated to three separate locations including Golitzin’s original cellars at Novy Svet, and was to remain there until after the liberation of Yalta by the Detached Seaboard Army in April 1944. Late in 1944, the entire Collection was returned to its original resting place.


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1945
Massandra: Massandra Red Port
LIMITED In Stock (3 Available)

Massandra Ports

 

The production of ‘Port’ wine began in the Crimea in 1871 under the direction of Prince Golitzin and was further developed on a commercial scale by I.A. Bianki, A.P. Serboulenko and A.V. Keller. Massandra Red Port is the produce of several grape varieties grown in more than one viticultural region. The main grape used was Mourvedre (60-70%) which was blended with a selection of local grapes of which Saperavi was the most important. Harvested when the sugar content was about 20% the must was fortified to produce a wine with an alcohol level of between 17-19% and a residual sugar of between 60 and 100 grams per litre. The wine was aged for three years in large oak casks before bottling. The oldest known vintage is the 1893.

 

Bright, pale red. Reticent nose. Relatively dry palate, some fruit, characterful dry finish.

THE MASSANDRA COLLECTION

It is difficult to establish exactly when the Massandra Collection was started but Prince Golitzin donated a large number of wines he had obtained from Europe as well as ones he had made himself. The Collection remained quite safe until the Revolution in October 1917. Although the Bolsheviks established Soviet power by the middle of January 1918 Massandra and the Crimea remained in the control of the White Russians. The violent struggle continued for a further three years exacerbated by German invaders, Anglo-French interventionists and the Russian Counter revolution. Throughout this period, the Collection remained hidden because of the entrance to the tunnels in which it was stored had been bricked up and concealed.

 

In November 1920 the Red Army finally took control of the Crimea and the Collection was discovered intact shortly afterwards. In 1922 on Stalin’s orders all the wines to be found in any of the Tsar’s palaces including those at Moscow, St. Petersburg and Livadia were brought to Massandra. Some of these were sold off at this time but the majority were added to the Collection.

 

Upon Nazi invasion in 1941, the Collection was evacuated to three separate locations including Golitzin’s original cellars at Novy Svet, and was to remain there until after the liberation of Yalta by the Detached Seaboard Army in April 1944. Late in 1944, the entire Collection was returned to its original resting place.


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1945
Massandra: South Coast White Muscat
LIMITED In Stock (1 Available)

Muscats

 

With extended ageing these Muscats become intensely perfumed and refined.

 

Ambre ochre colour. Classic muscat nose and palate, refined, mouthfilling with excellent acidity. Will develop further.

THE MASSANDRA COLLECTION

It is difficult to establish exactly when the Massandra Collection was started but Prince Golitzin donated a large number of wines he had obtained from Europe as well as ones he had made himself. The Collection remained quite safe until the Revolution in October 1917. Although the Bolsheviks established Soviet power by the middle of January 1918 Massandra and the Crimea remained in the control of the White Russians. The violent struggle continued for a further three years exacerbated by German invaders, Anglo-French interventionists and the Russian Counter revolution. Throughout this period, the Collection remained hidden because of the entrance to the tunnels in which it was stored had been bricked up and concealed.

 

In November 1920 the Red Army finally took control of the Crimea and the Collection was discovered intact shortly afterwards. In 1922 on Stalin’s orders all the wines to be found in any of the Tsar’s palaces including those at Moscow, St. Petersburg and Livadia were brought to Massandra. Some of these were sold off at this time but the majority were added to the Collection.

 

Upon Nazi invasion in 1941, the Collection was evacuated to three separate locations including Golitzin’s original cellars at Novy Svet, and was to remain there until after the liberation of Yalta by the Detached Seaboard Army in April 1944. Late in 1944, the entire Collection was returned to its original resting place.


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NV
2012
2011
Quinta do Noval: Vintage Port
In Stock (16 Available)
WINE
ADVOCATE
94-96

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2001
Quinta do Vesuvio: Vintage Port
LIMITED In Stock (3 Available)
SOTHEBY'S
92

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2013